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Opinion

  • by Bob Sacks
    Posted September 29, 2013
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  • BoSacks Interview with Malcolm Netburn, CEO of CDS Global

    BoSacks Interview with Malcolm Netburn, CEO of CDS Global

    In framing today's dialog and before I ask the more difficult questions, I would like to build a framework for my readers, not all of whom are fulfillment experts. Can you describe what services CDS Global provides in the current volatile media business?  I guess simply put I am asking, can you describe for the laymen of our industry the character of a successful fulfillment provider in today's publishing landscape and where it sits in the ever changing content value chain?

     

    In this age of disruptive media, CDS Global is an enabler of all the ways in which content can now be distributed in a world of agnostic distribution. We are the essential link between the industry and the consumer, deepening the customer experience. That's why we no longer think of ourselves or brand ourselves as a "fulfillment company." It's also why technology sits at the core of our investments and initiatives.

     

    This work now involves partnering in brand extensions and focusing on the customer experience, in delivering business intelligence, and in integrating social media into that consumer experience. With the user experience being as essential as the content provided, successful fulfillment companies find themselves more and more at the early-stage decision table rather than in the traditional role of fulfillment as a back-end service. READ THE FULL ARTICLE

     

     

    by Bob Sacks
    Posted September 29, 2013
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  • THE MEDIA SUPERNOVA

    THE MEDIA SUPERNOVA

    There are more ways than ever to consume media, and more media than ever to consume. But as the landscape becomes ever more fragmented and advertising revenue continues to stall, Bob and Brooke ask the question: is the Golden Age of content sustainable, or just a supernova, a dying star burning exceptionally bright?

    LISTEN TO THIS BROADAST

    Posted September 03, 2013
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  • Vogue, Tatler and other high-end women's magazines target teen market

    Vogue, Tatler and other high-end women's magazines target teen market

    Posted by Ami Sedghi

    Observers say move is attempt to secure future generation of readers in industry suffering endemic declines in print sales. Miss Vogue: there are plans for a second issue next year, though details have not yet been confirmed

    With parted blonde locks, bubblegum pink lips and a knitted jumper thrown over a denim shirt, 19-year-old model Tigerlily Taylor has the perfectly stylised look that befits the front cover of Teen Tatler.

    But despite the baby pink background, Taylor represents a new type of teen: fashion-savvy, confident and with the power to spend. And high-end women's magazines are desperate to appeal to this new generation of reader.

    In May Vogue launched youth-targeted spinoff Miss Vogue, and the September issue of Tatler was accompanied with a glossy teenage supplement.

    At first glance, the newly launched magazines may look like a revival of the teenage print market. But industry observers describe the move as an attempt to secure a future generation of readers in an industry suffering endemic declines in print sales.FULL ARTICLE

    Posted August 30, 2013
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  • On the Newsstand, Audited Magazines Continue to Slide

    On the Newsstand, Audited Magazines Continue to Slide

    Generally, observers have been focusing on the sad performance of the past five-plus years, where total units are off by more than 40% and dollars by more than 30%.  The New Single Copy decided to take a look at our review of the first half of 2003, ten years ago.  Then, total unit sales for audited magazines were nearly 474 million copies.  This year it's 250,000.  That's a drop of 47.2%.  Retail dollars went from more than $1.5 billion to $967 million, slipping 36.7%, and that's without any adjustment for inflation.  Another point: The preliminary data for the first half of 2003 was based on 537 magazines with any single copy sales.  This year the AAM reports contained only 346.  Publishers seem to be making an emphatic statement about their confidence or lack of it in the retail marketplac

    by John Harrington
    Posted August 15, 2013
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  • What is a Publisher?

    Most of us who read this magazine are in the word business. We are so sophisticated at this business that our expertise in wordsmanship has actual monetary value. People are willing to pay in one way or another for the clever and useful words we produce. I would add to that that we, and perhaps musicians, are one of the few industries that don't actually produce a physical product.

    by Bob Sacks
    Posted April 08, 2013
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